High Point man reacts after his neighbor faces dog fighting charges


A High Point man shared his thoughts and reactions with WXII 12 News after learning that his neighbor is facing dog fighting charges.GUILFORD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE: The Guilford County Sheriff’s Office announced on Wednesday that deputies arrested Toriano Cave, 51, of High Point that morning , and charged him with one felony count of owning dogs and using them to fight other dogs or animals.Authorities said they seized 15 dogs — including three adult males, three adult females, and nine recently-born puppies — at his house on Penny Road , near Mill Lane, in High Point.Officials said the Guilford County Animal Services, The American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), and the United States Department of Agriculture helped with the case.WXII 12 News reached out to the Guilford County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday. An official got back with us and declined an interview. He cited the ongoing investigation as to the reason why.We also reached out to Guilford County Animal Services. We’re still waiting to hear back.ASPCA:WXII 12 News talked with a spokesperson with the ASPCA on Thursdays. The organization’s mission is “to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States,” according to its website.The official got back with us and shared the following statement from Kristen Collins, vice president of ASPCA rehabilitation services late Thursday afternoon.”Although a felony in all 50 states, dogfighting still occurs in every part of the country and in every type of community. Based on fight reports in underground dogfighting publications, and on animals entering shelters bearing evidence of fighting, we suggest that there are tens of thousands of dog fighters in the US, forcing hundreds of thousands of dogs to train, fight, and suffer every year.Since 2010, the ASPCA has assisted nearly 6,000 victims of dogfighting through more than 300 deployments, consultations, and investigations. forensics experts have documented unique patterns of injuries in dogs that have been used in organized dogfighting, which has been successfully used in the prosecution of dogfighters. Our behavior teams have continued to refine our forensic evaluation procedures to contribute to prosecutorial behavior efforts and to aid in the successful placement of many such dogs into loving homes.Because of reprehensible breeding practices and irresponsible upbringing, some fighting dogs are fearful of people, and experiences, some show aggression toward other dogs, and some are easily aroused and highly excitable. ASPCA experts at our Behavioral Rehabilitation Center (BRC) in North Carolina and at our other facilities focus on enrichment, socialization and behavior to prepare victims of animal cruelty for adoption. For instance, dogs who show impulsive, frustrated behavior learn how to appropriately interact with people, and extremely fearful, undersocialized dogs receive intensive rehabilitation to overcome their anxieties. In addition to providing direct care for victims of dogfighting, the ASPCA has continued to provide training and on-the-ground assistance to law enforcement agencies throughout North America in their efforts against dogfighting. We have also worked with policy makers and advocates to combat laws that discriminate against dogs based on breed rather than behavior and that place responsible owners of well-behaved dogs in jeopardy of losing their homes and beloved pets.”HIGH POINT NEIGHBOR:WXII 12 News Talked with Keith Waters, who lived near Toriano Cave. He’s lived in the area for nine years.Waters has three dogs who he said he considers family.He said the news about his neighbor did not surprise him.”I had long suspected that he was involved in dog fighting,” Waters said.Next to Cave’s home is a public walkway. The path sits between Cave’s home and a neighborhood.From the public walkway, WXII 12 News saw several small shelters made out of what looked like barrels in Cave’s backyard. The shelters were surrounded by metal fencing.”You walk by that place. You walk by his house on the greenway, and you see all those dogs back there,” Waters said. So why would he have all of those dogs back there.”Waters told WXII 12 News that he would see the dogs at times. I have actually petted them. They’re very friendly, but they have a dual nature. And the negative side of their nature can cause them to snap in a situation and go after another dog. So I’m not sure what authorities are going to do about it. I feel so sorry for the dogs.”Not only did he see the dogs, Waters said he and other neighbors could hear the dogs and the owner as well.”You can tell when he came out there and yelled at them, he was concerned he would get a complaint. And that’s what eventually happened,” he said.Waters said nobody wins in a situation like this — including the dogs involved in this case.”The dogs, of course, are the victims in all this. The dogs have done nothing, but what they were trained to do,” Waters said.

A High Point man shared his thoughts and reactions with WXII 12 News after learning that his neighbor is facing dog fighting charges.

GUILFORD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE:

The Guilford County Sheriff’s Office announced on Wednesday that deputies arrested Toriano Cave, 51, of High Point that morning, and charged him with one felony count of owning dogs and using them to fight other dogs or animals.

toriano cave's home

Authorities said they seized 15 dogs — including three adult males, three adult females, and nine recently-born puppies — at his house on Penny Road, near Mill Lane, in High Point.

Officials said the Guilford County Animal Services, The American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), and the United States Department of Agriculture helped with the case.

WXII 12 News reached out to the Guilford County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday. An official got back with us and declined an interview. He cited the ongoing investigation as to the reason why.

shelter seen in cave's backyard

We also reached out to Guilford County Animal Services. We’re still waiting to hear back.

ASPCA:

WXII 12 News talked with a spokesperson with the ASPCA on Thursdays. The organization’s mission is “to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States,” according to its website.

The official got back with us and shared the following statement from Kristen Collins, vice president of ASPCA rehabilitation services late Thursday afternoon.

Although a felony in all 50 states, dogfighting still occurs in every part of the country and in every type of community. As with any other illegal underground activity, it is impossible to determine how many people may be involved in dogfighting. Estimates based on fight reports in underground dogfighting publications, and on animals entering shelters bearing evidence of fighting, suggest that there are tens of thousands of dog fighters in the US, forcing hundreds of thousands of dogs to train, fight, and suffer every year.

Since 2010, the ASPCA has assisted nearly 6,000 victims of dogfighting through more than 300 deployments, consultations, and investigations. Our veterinary forensics experts have documented unique patterns of injuries in dogs that have been used in organized dogfighting, which has been successfully used in the prosecution of dogfighters. Our behavior teams have continued to refine our forensic evaluation procedures to contribute to prosecutorial behavior efforts and to aid in the successful placement of many such dogs into loving homes.

Because of reprehensible breeding practices and irresponsible upbringing, some fighting dogs are fearful of people, places and experiences, some show aggression toward other dogs, and some are easily aroused and highly excitable. ASPCA experts at our Behavioral Rehabilitation Center (BRC) in North Carolina and at our other facilities focus on enrichment, socialization and behavior modification to prepare victims of animal cruelty for adoption. For instance, dogs who show impulsive, frustrated behavior learn how to appropriately interact with people, and extremely fearful, undersocialized dogs receive intensive rehabilitation to overcome their anxieties.

In addition to providing direct care for victims of dogfighting, the ASPCA has continued to provide training and on-the-ground assistance to law enforcement throughout North America in their efforts against dogfighting. We have also worked with policy makers and advocates to combat laws that discriminate against dogs based on breed rather than behavior and that place responsible owners of well-behaved dogs in jeopardy of losing their homes and beloved pets.”

HIGH POINT NEIGHBOR:

WXII 12 News talked with Keith Waters, who lives near Toriano Cave.

keith waters

He’s lived in the area for nine years.

Waters has three dogs who he said he considers family.

He said the news about his neighbor did not surprise him.

“I had long fighting suspected that he was involved in dog,” Waters said.

Next to Cave’s home is a public walkway. The path sits between Cave’s home and a neighborhood.

public walkway next to cave's house

From the public walkway, WXII 12 News saw several small shelters made out of what looked like barrels in Cave’s backyard. The shelters were surrounded by metal fencing.

“You walk by that place. You walk by his house on the greenway, and you see all those dogs back there,” Waters said. “He’s not a dog lover. So why would he have all of those dogs back there.”

Waters told WXII 12 News that he would see the dogs at times.

He said, “I have met these dogs. I have actually petted them. They’re very friendly, but they have a dual nature. And the negative side of their nature can them to snap in a situation and go after another dog. So I’m not sure what authorities are going to do about it.

keith waters

Not only did he see the dogs, Waters said he and other neighbors could hear the dogs and the owner as well.

“You can tell when he came out there and yelled at them, he was concerned he would get a complaint. And that’s what eventually happened,” he said.

Waters said nobody wins in a situation like this — including the dogs involved in this case.

“The dogs, of course, are the victims in all this. The dogs have done nothing, but what they were trained to do,” Waters said.

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