Python in Boon Lay swallows cat halfway but gives up & leaves carcass on road – Mothership.SG


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A python was caught on video swallowing a cat whole in Boon Lay, but did not manage to finish consuming it.

The snake ended up regurgitating its meal, leaving behind the carcass by the side of the road.

Videos of the incident were put up on Facebook on June 16.

What videos showed

The python was caught in the act of swallowing the cat, which stopped passers-by in their tracks as they could only gawk at the scene in broad daylight.

The passers-by initially appeared baffled as to what was going on, with the woman recording off-camera trying to figure out the animal that was being eaten.

It then occurred to her and the fellow passers-by that the lifeless animal was a cat.

The limbs and body of cat could be seen being expelled from the python’s mouth, as it slithered in reverse.

More than half the cat had been swallowed at that point.

The python then slithered towards the drain cover by the road

The caption on the post said the cat could be a community cat in the area.

Carcass cleared eventually

According to the post, the Animal & Veterinary Service (AVS) was alerted and they removed the cat’s carcass.

Background on pythons in Singapore

Reticulated pythons are native to Singapore and they have adapted well to the urban areas.

Pythons prey on smaller animals such as rats, and sometimes even cats.

Previously, wildlife rescue group Acres explained that the curious nature of cats may make them an easy target if they got close to the snake.

While incidents of community cats being eaten up by pythons have saddened residents, both animals are part of the ecosystem in this urban city.

Acres said:

“We feel sorry for the loss of the beloved cat. It is unfortunate but these are some of the risks community animals will face in our urban landscape. They are all animals trying to survive.”

What to do if you see a python in Singapore

Like many other wild animals, pythons are shy and will not attack unless provoked or threaten.

If you see python or snakes in urban areas, you can call the Acres wildlife rescue hotline at 9783 7782 or NParks at 1800-476-1600 which will send an expert to assist you.

If a snake is spotted near trees, bushes or in drains, it is advised to leave them alone as these are their natural habitats.

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